Nora Eccles Harrison Cardiovascular Research & Training Institute

May 12, 2022

In this video segment of the CVRTI Seminar Series, invited speaker, Dr. Jared Bunch, discusses improving brain health in patients with atrial fibrillation.

Speaker:
T. Jared Bunch, MD, FACC, FHRS
Professor of Medicine
Section Chief, Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology
University of Utah


April 21, 2022

In this video segment of the CVRTI Seminar Series, invited speaker, Dr. Jonathan Kirk, discusses cardiac sarcomere protein quality control and the gene encoding BAG3.
 
Dr. Kirk discusses the challenges involved with repairing the sarcomere without stopping the heart, analogous to repairing a car engine without stopping the car. His work builds on prior studies from the late 1960s that examine how heart muscle becomes weak in heart failure. Currently, Dr. Kirk explores the role of BAG3 and other associated proteins in the failing heart.
  
Speaker:
Jonathan A. Kirk, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology
Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine

March 10, 2022

 
In this video segment of the CVRTI Seminar Series, invited speaker, Dr. Edward Dibella, discusses Cardiac MRI imaging for measuring myocardial fibrosis, perfusion and oxygenation.
 
Dr. Dibella discusses the technical mechanism and physics involved with generating an MRI image and the relevance of imaging in the cardiology clinical setting. The seminar concludes with a discussion on the challenges of obtaining images and future directions for improving MRI imaging to obtain better results in the cardiovascular system.
 
Speaker:
Edward Dibella, PhD
Professor of Radiology and Imaging Sciences
Adjunct Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Biomedical Engineering
Director of the Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research (UCAIR)
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

February 17, 2022

In this video segment of the CVRTI Seminar Series, invited distinguished speaker, Dr. Kirk Knowlton, presents his current research on myocarditis involving the cytoskeletal elements found in heart muscle cells in response to exposure to viruses such as Coxsackievirus and Coronavirus.
 
Dr. Knowlton begins the seminar with a look at traditional myocarditis. The Knowlton Lab investigates possible genetic and/or environmental factors which compromise the cell membrane and allow a virus to enter the cell much easier than under normal conditions. Dr. Knowlton concludes with a discussion of COVID-19 effects on the cardiovascular system and possible treatment approaches, including a discussion on monoclonal antibody treatment of COVID-19 as it pertains to the heart.
 
Speaker:
Kirk U. Knowlton, MD, FACC, FAHA
Intermountain Medical Center
Salt Lake City, Utah

February 10, 2022

In this video segment of the CVRTI Seminar Series, invited distinguished speaker, Dr. Anthony Donato Speaker: Anthony Donato, PhD Co-In this video segment of the CVRTI Seminar Series, invited distinguished University of Utah speaker, Dr. Anthony Donato, describes arterial senescence (cell death) and telomere dysfunction relating to arterial aging.
 
Dr. Donato’s findings suggest the majority of cardiovascular death is due to arterial disease. His laboratory investigates the capped ends of chromosomes, also known as telomeres, and uses translational research genetic models to explore possible interventions to preserve telomere length and arterial health.
 
Speaker:
Anthony Donato, PhD
Co-Directory, Translation Vascular Physiology Laboratory
Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah

December 16, 2021

 
In this video segment of the CVRTI Seminar Series, invited distinguished speaker, Dr. Mario Delmar, describes the function and role of the gene Plakophilin-2 (PKP2) in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy—an inherited heart muscle disease.
Dr. Delmar’s findings suggest that a mutation in the PKP2 gene can cause the muscle cells of the heart to be replaced with fatty tissue causing the normally strong but flexible heart, to be more rigid and weak. This disease may at first be quite subtle with effects such as diminished performance, but can advance to more serious effects including heart failure and sudden cardiac death.   
 
Speaker:
Mario Delmar, MD, PhD
Patricia M. and Robert H. Martinsen Professor of Cardiology, Department of Medicine at NYU Grossman School of Medicine
Professor, Department of Cell Biology at NYU Grossman School of Medicine
New York University

November 18, 2021

In today’s video, CVRTI hosts its final Seminar of 2021 to discuss Plakophilin-2 Deficiency, Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy, and more. Speakers: Mario Delmar, MD, PhD Patricia M. and Robert H. Martinsen Professor of Cardiology, Department of Medicine at NYU Grossman School of Medicine Professor, Department of Cell Biology at NYU Grossman School of MeIn this video segment of the CVRTI Seminar Series, invited distinguished speaker, Dr. Yoram Rudy, presents his current research of modeling and imaging cardiac electrical excitation.
 
Dr. Rudy’s discussion of his current work follows disease progression starting with ion channels located inside the cells of the heart, where structural changes cause electrical activity of the heart to change. These changes often have a dramatic impact on the larger components causing deleterious effects in larger systems such as cells, tissues, organs and even the entire organism. Dr. Rudy developed Non-Invasive Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) to aid in the detection and treatment of these cardiovascular anomalies.
  
Speaker:
Yoram Rudy Ph.D., F.A.H.A., F.H.R.S
Director, Cardiac Bioelectricity and Arrhythmia Center (CBAC)
The Fred Saigh Distinguished Professor of Engineering 
Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Cell Biology & Physiology, Medicine, Radiology, and Pediatrics
Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri